The JFK Assassination

An Easy Shot ?

Evidence the Limo Fragments did NOT come from the head shot

Evidence the Rifle in the Window was NOT a Carcano

See No Evil

Hear No Evil

Evidence Oswald did not know the motorcade route

Evidence Oswald was "a rather poor shot"

Evidence Oswald was on the 1st floor during the shooting

FBI threatening of witnesses

W.W. Litchfield

Marina Oswald

Marina's Credibility

Marina & "Hidell"

Problems with Marina's testimony against her husband

Proof the Dallas Police falsified evidence against Oswald

The "Misfired" Round

Bullets in the Pocket

Proof the FBI lied in their Reports

Proof the Warren Commission predetermined Oswald's guilt

The Cab Ride

The Lunchroom Encounter

The WC alters timing

More evidence that Oswald was on the first floor

The Paper Gunsack

Evidence the "Gunsack was never on the 6th floor

Evidence the "Gunsack" was made on the afternoon of 11/22/63

Evidence the rifle was never in the "Gunsack"

Evidence the bag Oswald brought to work contained his lunch

The Paraffin Tests

Evidence Oswald had not fired a rifle

Evidence Oswald had not fired a handgun

The Rifle

Evidence the Depository rifle was not part of the February shipment to Klein's

Evidence that Oswald was at work when the money order for the rifle was purchased and the envelope mailed

Evidence that the "$ 21.45" entry on Klein's bank account statement was not the "Hidell" money order

Evidence that Oswald's handwriting was easily forgeable

Evidence the rifle in the "Backyard Photos" is not the Depository Rifle

Evidence that the Depository Rifle had not been fired on 11/22/63

Evidence that Klein's Sporting Goods did not mount the scope on the Depository Rifle

Evidence that Oswald could not afford to order the weapons

The Rifle Ammo

The Searches

The Spent Shells

The Witness

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Tippit Murder

Evidence that affidavits were falsified

Ted Callaway

Sam Guinyard

William Whalley

Proof the bullets recovered from Tippit's body did not match the bullets in evidence

Evidence that the police lineups were unfair

Evidence that the Tippit killer's jacket was white

News video shows the jacket was white

Problems with the gray jacket's chain of custody

Evidence that the witnesses described the jacket of the Tippit murderer as white

Evidence that the police radio description of the jacket found was white

Evidence that the witnesses refused to identify the gray jacket as the jacket the killer wore

Skeptical witness identification of the gray jacket as the jacket the killer wore

More problems with the evidence

Evidence the unfired .38 rounds came from police

The Handgun

 

The Witnesses

William A. Smith & Jimmy Burt

B.M. "Pat" Patterson

W.W.Scoggins

 

 

 

 

The Walker Shooting

The "Walker" bullet

Problems with the Chain of Custody of CE 573

Spectrographic evidence that CE 573 was not the same ammunition fired at JFK

Gen. Walker to HSCA: "Walker bullet" not Walker bullet

 The "Walker Note"

  The Witness

 

 

 

 

Howard Brennan:

THE PLAZA "WITNESS"

"Brennan...appears to be one of those self-promoting bystanders who because of....the need to be associated with some great tragedy -- pretend knowledge of the event when they actually have no information." ( Gerald McKnight, Breach of Trust, pg. 398 )

 

Placing Oswald on the sixth floor with the rifle in his hands was tantamount to the Commission's proving that he fired the shots at the motorcade in Dealey Plaza. In order to do this, the Warren Report banked heavily on the testimony of a single witness, Howard Leslie Brennan. Brennan was standing at the corner of Houston and Elm facing the Texas Book Depository in Dealey Plaza when JFK was assassinated. 

Brennan was the only witness to claim that he saw Lee Harvey Oswald fire from the 6th floor window of the Texas School Book Depository.

The Report stressed that Brennan was in an "excellent position" to observe anyone in the window and was an "accurate observer". It was Brennan's description, the Report said, that went out over the police radio minutes after the assassination.

The Commission had problems trying to establish the fact that Brennan was, in fact, the source of the description of the shooter. Articles began appearing pointing out contradictions in Brennan's testimony as it appeared in the Report. Two weeks after the Report was made public, Commission Head Counsel J. Lee Rankin wrote Hoover twice, on December 2 and again on the 18th, requesting a complete chain "from Brennan to the police dept.". Although they tried, the FBI failed to do so.

 

BRENNAN'S DESCRIPTION

He described seeing a white man "in his early thirties, fair complexion, slender but neat, possibly 5-foot 10, 160 to 170 pounds, wearing light colored clothes, more of a khaki color."

( 3 H 144-145 )

But that description does not match the clothes that Oswald was wearing that day.

And since there's no evidence that Oswald changed his clothes after the shooting, the man Brennan saw could not have been Oswald.

No matter how much the Warren Report massaged the facts, it could not establish Brennan's credibility.

 

BIZARRE CLAIMS

Brennan testified that he thought the first shot was a firecracker and although he never heard a second shot, after the third shot he looked up and saw that the gunman "stepped down out of sight". But the gunman couldn't have "stepped down" because the windowsill was only 12 inches up from the floor.

Brennan said that the gunman was standing and he could see the man "from the belt up." 

( 3 H 144 )

But Commission Exhibit 1311 indicates that that was an impossibility. 

A man Oswald's height is shown next to the window:



The FBI photograph inspires no more confidence in the Commission's claim that Oswald was either "kneeling or sitting". Had that been the case, Brennan could not have estimated the height and weight of the gunman from six stories down.


In addition, it is doubtful that Brennan could have identified someone through the filthy windows of the sixth floor:


At no time during his viewing of the police lineup did Brennan positively identify Oswald as the man he saw in the window firing. And this was AFTER he had seen Oswald on television. 

I'm still wondering how Brennan could have not heard a second shot and believe that the next shot was a third shot. If he didn't hear a second shot, shouldn't the next shot he hear BE the second shot ?


A POSITIVE IDENTIFICATION ?

At the lineup, Brennan selected Oswald as the person who most closely RESEMBLED the man he had seen in the window with the rifle, but he failed to make a positive identification. 

Mr. BRENNAN. I told Mr. Sorrels and Captain Fritz at that time that Oswald--or the man in the lineup that I identified looking more like a closest resemblance to the man in the window than anyone in the lineup. ( 3 H 147 ) 

Mr. BELIN. Now, is there anything else you told the officers at the time of the lineup? 

Mr. BRENNAN. Well, I TOLD THEM THAT I COULD NOT MAKE A POSITIVE IDENTIFICATION.
( 3 H 148 )

What makes Brennan's refusal to initially identify Oswald as the shooter even more compelling is that he saw Oswald on TV BEFORE he went down to view the police lineup:

Mr. BELIN. In the meantime, had you seen any pictures of Lee Harvey Oswald on television or in the newspapers? 

Mr. BRENNAN. Yes, on television. 

Mr. BELIN. About when was that, do you believe? 

Mr. BRENNAN. I believe I reached home quarter to three or something of that, 15 minutes either way, and I saw his picture twice on television before I went down to the police station for the lineup.


Mr. BELIN. What is the fact as to whether or not your having seen Oswald on television would have affected your identification of him one way or the other? 

Mr. BRENNAN. That is something I do not know.
( 3 H 147-148 )

After Oswald was dead, a federal agent spoke with him. It was not Brennan but a "Secret Service man from Houston" who first suggested "security reasons" as an excuse to the reluctant witness: "You said you couldn't make a positive identification. Did you do that for security reasons personally or couldn't you?" is how Brennan quoted the agent. ( 3 H 148

Mr. BELIN. did you ever LATER tell any officer or investigating person anything different? 

Mr. BRENNAN. Yes. 

Mr. BELIN. When did that happen? 

Mr. BRENNAN. I believe SOME DAYS LATER----I don't recall exactly--and I believe the Secret Service man identified hisself as being Williams, I believe, from Houston. I won't swear to that-whether his name was Williams or not. 


Then Brennan tells the circumstances under which he came to identify Oswald: 

Mr. BELIN. Well, what happened in between to change your mind that you later decided to come forth and tell them you could identify him? 

Mr. BRENNAN. AFTER OSWALD WAS KILLED, I was relieved quite a bit that as far as pressure on myself of somebody not wanting me to identify anybody, there was no longer that immediate danger. 


When he appeared before the Warren Commission, Brennan stated that he could have made the identification at the lineup. ( 3 H 148 )


FEARED FOR HIS LIFE ?

After Brennan came forward he told police he could have made a positive identification at the lineup but was afraid for the safety of himself and his family. 

Brennan's explanation that he failed to identify Oswald out of fear that he was the only eyewitness and, as such, might be silenced or killed. Posner cites the fact that Brennan considered moving his family and that the FBI posted guards at his house for three weeks. 

But this picture of a scared and reluctant witness has some cracks in it, however: According to Dallas Secret Service agent Forrest Sorrels, Brennan knew that he was not the only eyewitness. When Sorrels spoke with Brennan at the TSBD about half an hour after the assassination, Brennan himself pointed out young Amos Euins as another one who had seen the gunman. 

Mr. STERN. How did you happen to talk to Mr. Brennan?

Mr. SORRELS. I asked--I don't know who, someone there "Is there anyone here that saw anything?" And someone said, "That man over there."He was out in front of the building and I went right to him.

Mr. STERN. Did Mr. Brennan tell you anything else?

Mr. SORRELS. I asked him whether or not he thought he could identify the person that he saw, and he, of course, gave me a description of him, said that he appeared to be a slender man, he had on what appeared to be a light jacket or shirt or something to that effect, and that he thought he could identify him--said he was slender build. Because I was definitely interested in someone that had seen something that could give us some definite information. And I also asked if he had seen anybody else, and he pointed to a young colored boy there, by the name of Euins.


( 7 H 349

One wonders why if he feared for his safety he didn't take steps to avoid public exposure. 

Brennan asked David Belin during his testimony if the Commission had the television coverage of his interview with Secret Service agents at the crime scene. Brennan's instant celebrity, his name and face, had been broadcast all over Dallas BEFORE HE HAD EVEN SEEN THE LINEUP. 

In August, 1964, before the release of the Warren Report, Brennan spoke on camera with CBS News, for their nationwide broadcast, "CBS News Extra: November 22, 1963 and the Warren Report," aired on September 27, 1964. Interviews were done, according to narrator Walter Cronkite, a month before the telecast and the release of the Warren Report.  

( In the CBS program, Brennan blatantly contradicted his sworn Warren Commission testimony when, having blown his cover, he told the nation that "The President's head just exploded." 

Brennan also posed for a photograph which appeared in the October 2, 1964 issue of Life magazine. 

If Brennan was taking steps to avoid public exposure, they were certainly extraordinary steps. 

In both his Sheriff's Department statement and his comments to Sorrels, Brennan indicated a willingness to identify the man in the window "if I ever saw him again." 

The most reasonable explanation for Brennan's failure to ever make a positive identification of the man is that he never saw him again--at the lineup or elsewhere.

Brennan had told the Commission that he had been sitting on the wall facing Elm St. as depicted in Commission Exhibits 477 and 478:

Representative Ford. Are those the positions where you were sitting on November 22?
Mr. BRENNAN. Yes, sir.
Representative FORD. At about 12
Mr. BRENNAN. From about 12:22 or 12:24 until the time of the assassination.
Representative FORD. In both pictures, that is a true--
Mr. BRENNAN. True location.
Representative FORD. True location of where you were sitting November 22d?
Mr. BRENNAN. Yes, sir.

( 3 H 142 )

But Commission Exhibit 479, a frame from the Zapruder film, shows Brennan sitting on the wall facing HOUSTON ST. and having to twist his body to his left to view the motorcade traveling down Elm:

 

 

SUPERB EYESIGHT ?

On his website, Warren Commission supporter Prof. Ken Rahn of URI describes Brennan as a "steamfitter with superb eyesight". Brennan was farsighted, wore glasses for reading and had both eyes sandblasted in January 1964. In fact, Brennan's eyesight was so bad at the time of the assassination, he was unsure of how many people were in the lineup and estimated  "seven, more or less one". 

( 3 H 147

The Oswald lineups never consisted of more than 4 people.

When Brennan was asked if all of the men in the lineup were white, he "couldn't remember".

( ibid. )

Brennan testified that at the lineup, he told Fritz and Sorrels that Oswald was the one with the "closest resemblance" to the man in the window. ( ibid. )

But Fritz wasn't at that lineup and didn't even know that there had been a lineup until Sorrels called him and told him. ( 4 H 237 )

Brennan was able to identify "two negroes" who had been in the window one floor BELOW the shooter, but was "unable to remember" if he had heard them admit they were there.

( 3 H 146 )

Howard Brennan saw more people in the lineup than were actually there. He saw Fritz at the lineup when Fritz WASN'T there. He saw a gunman standing in the window firing when it was an impossibility. 

There's a reason why Howard Brennan wouldn't pick Oswald out of the lineup. 

His eyesight was so bad, he couldn't honestly pick anyone out of the lineup.

 

SO WHICH LINEUP DID HE VIEW ?

Brennan testified that he was picked up by the Secret Service "at 6 o'clock promptly" ( 6pm on November 22nd ) . ( 3 H 160 )

That would have put him at the 6:30 lineup with Tippit witnesses Ted Callaway and Sam Guinyard and bus driver Cecil McWatters.

But Callaway described only himself, Guinyard and McWatters at the lineup. ( 3 H 355 )

Fritz told the Commission that Brennan was at the same lineup as the Davis "sisters" ( 4 H 237 ) , which did not occur until 7:55 pm.

So did Brennan sit in the police station for almost two hours waiting for the 7:55 lineup ?

Barbara Davis said that the only ones who were at the lineup she saw were herself, her husband, her sister-in-law and police officers in suits. ( 3 H 346 )

Her account is verified by her sister-in-law, Virginia ( 6 H 461 )

Brennan is not described in any account of any witness who viewed any police lineup as having been at their lineup.

And not one Dallas Police officer ever gave testimony claiming to have been present at or making reference to a lineup viewed by Brennan.

In fact, CE 2003, pg 293 is a list of ALL witnesses who viewed Oswald in a police lineup. 

Howard Brennan's name is not among them.

No documentation exists that tells when Howard Brennan viewed a lineup, what officials were present during that lineup, the names and descriptions of the persons who participated in the lineup with Oswald--no information whatsoever.


 

 

 

NOTABLE NOTES FOR THIS PAGE


At the lineup, Brennan selected Oswald as the person who most closely resembled the man he had seen in the window with the rifle, but he failed to make a positive identification. 

After an "agent" spoke with him a few weeks later, Brennan seemed to revert to being unable to positively identify Oswald. 

The relationship of the windowsill to the floor made it impossible for the shooter to be standing while firing, as Brennan claimed. If the shooter was sitting or kneeling, it would have been impossible for Brennan to estimate his height and weight..

Brennan's description of the clothing worn by the man in the window was inconsistent with the outfit Oswald was wearing that day.

His failure to make a positive identification of Oswald, as well as the issue of the gunman's clothing, make it impossible to fairly cite Brennan as proof that Lee Harvey Oswald was on the sixth floor, a fact 
which even the Warren Commission recognized. 

The Warren Commission dealt with the dilemma of Brennan's uncertainty in this manner: 

"The Commission ... does not base its conclusions concerning the identity of the assassin on Brennan's subsequent 
certain identification of Lee Harvey Oswald as the man he saw fire the rifle...  

According to Secret Service agent Forrest Sorrels, Brennan knew that he was not the only eyewitness. When Sorrels spoke with Brennan at the TSBD about half an hour after the assassination, Brennan himself pointed out young Amos Euins as one who had seen the gunman. 

The most reasonable explanation for Brennan's failure to ever make a positive identification of the man is that he never saw him again--at the lineup or elsewhere. Brennan's eyesight was so bad at the time he viewed the lineup, he told the Commission the lineup consisted of "seven, more or less one". There were never more than 4 in any lineup.

It was not Brennan but a "Secret Service man from Houston" who first suggested "security reasons" as an excuse to the reluctant witness: "You said you couldn't make a positive identification. Did you do that for security reasons personally or couldn't you?" is how Brennan quoted the agent.  

In August, 1964, before the release of the Warren Report, Brennan spoke on camera with CBS News, for their nationwide broadcast, "CBS News Extra: November 22, 1963 and the Warren Report," aired on 
September 27, 1964. Interviews were done, according to narrator Walter Cronkite, a month before the telecast and the release of the Warren Report. 

Brennan also posed for a photograph which appeared in the October 2, 1964 issue of Life magazine. If Brennan was taking steps to avoid public exposure, they were certainly extraordinary steps. ( In the CBS program, Brennan blatantly contradicted his sworn Warren Commission testimony when he told the nation that "The President's head just exploded." )

Brennan's eyesight was so poor that he could not determine how many people were in the lineup.

Brennan's eyesight was so poor that he "couldn't remember" if all of the men in the lineup were white.

Brennan's eyesight was so poor that he saw Capt. Fritz at the lineup when Fritz wasn't there.

No Dallas Police officer ever made a reference in testimony to a lineup viewed by Brennan.

Brennan's name does not appear on any witness list as having viewed one of the Oswald lineups.