The JFK Assassination

An Easy Shot ?

Evidence the Limo Fragments did NOT come from the head shot

Evidence the Rifle in the Window was NOT a Carcano

See No Evil

Hear No Evil

Evidence Oswald did not know the motorcade route

Evidence Oswald was "a rather poor shot"

Evidence Oswald was on the 1st floor during the shooting

FBI threatening of witnesses

W.W. Litchfield

Marina Oswald

Marina's Credibility

Marina & "Hidell"

Problems with Marina's testimony against her husband

Proof the Dallas Police falsified evidence against Oswald

The "Misfired" Round

Bullets in the Pocket

Proof the FBI lied in their Reports

Proof the Warren Commission predetermined Oswald's guilt

The Cab Ride

The Lunchroom Encounter

The WC alters timing

More evidence that Oswald was on the first floor

The Paper Gunsack

Evidence the "Gunsack was never on the 6th floor

Evidence the "Gunsack" was made on the afternoon of 11/22/63

Evidence the rifle was never in the "Gunsack"

Evidence the bag Oswald brought to work contained his lunch

The Paraffin Tests

Evidence Oswald had not fired a rifle

Evidence Oswald had not fired a handgun

The Rifle

Evidence the Depository rifle was not part of the February shipment to Klein's

Evidence that Oswald was at work when the money order for the rifle was purchased and the envelope mailed

Evidence that the "$ 21.45" entry on Klein's bank account statement was not the "Hidell" money order

Evidence that Oswald's handwriting was easily forgeable

Evidence the rifle in the "Backyard Photos" is not the Depository Rifle

Evidence that the Depository Rifle had not been fired on 11/22/63

Evidence that Klein's Sporting Goods did not mount the scope on the Depository Rifle

Evidence that Oswald could not afford to order the weapons

The Rifle Ammo

The Searches

The Spent Shells

The Witness

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Tippit Murder

Evidence that affidavits were falsified

Ted Callaway

Sam Guinyard

William Whalley

Proof the bullets recovered from Tippit's body did not match the bullets in evidence

Evidence that the police lineups were unfair

Evidence that the Tippit killer's jacket was white

News video shows the jacket was white

Problems with the gray jacket's chain of custody

Evidence that the witnesses described the jacket of the Tippit murderer as white

Evidence that the police radio description of the jacket found was white

Evidence that the witnesses refused to identify the gray jacket as the jacket the killer wore

Skeptical witness identification of the gray jacket as the jacket the killer wore

More problems with the evidence

Evidence the unfired .38 rounds came from police

The Handgun

 

The Witnesses

William A. Smith & Jimmy Burt

B.M. "Pat" Patterson

W.W.Scoggins

 

 

 

 

The Walker Shooting

The "Walker" bullet

Problems with the Chain of Custody of CE 573

Spectrographic evidence that CE 573 was not the same ammunition fired at JFK

Gen. Walker to HSCA: "Walker bullet" not Walker bullet

 The "Walker Note"

  The Witness

 

 

 

 

An Examination of the Evidence Against Oswald for the Attempted Murder of General Edwin A. Walker

 

 

At approximately 9 p.m., on April 10, 1963, in Dallas, Tex., Maj. Gen. Edwin A. Walker, an active and controversial figure on the American political scene since his resignation from the U.S. Army in 1961, narrowly escaped death when a rifle bullet fired from .outside his home passed near his head as he was seated at his desk. There were no eyewitnesses, although a 14-year-old boy in a neighboring house claimed that immediately after the shooting he saw two men, in separate cars, drive out of a church parking lot adjacent to Walker's home. A friend of Walker's testified that two nights before the shooting he saw "two men around the house peeking in windows."  General Walker gave this information to the police before the shooting, but it did not help solve the crime. 

Although the bullet was recovered from Walker's house (see app. X, p. 562), in the absence of a weapon it was of little investigatory value. General Walker hired two investigators to determine whether a former employee might have been involved in the shooting. Their results were negative. Until December 3, 1963, the Walker shooting remained unsolved.

The Commission evaluated the following evidence in considering whether Lee Harvey Oswald fired the shot which almost killed General Walker: 

(1) A note which Oswald left for his wife on the evening of the shooting, 

( 2 ) photographs found among Oswald's possessions after the assassination of President Kennedy, 

(3) firearm identification of the bullet found in Walker's home, and 

(4) admissions and other statements made to Marina Oswald by Oswald concerning the shooting.

( Report, pg. 183 )

 

Based on (1) the contents of the note which Oswald left for his wife on April 10, 1963, (2) the photographs found among Oswald's possessions, (3) the testimony of firearms identification experts, and (4) the testimony of Marina Oswald, the Commission has concluded that Lee Harvey Oswald attempted to take the life of Maj. Gen. Edwin A. Walker (Resigned, U.S. Army) on April 10, 1963. The finding that Lee Harvey Oswald attempted to murder a public figure in April 1963 was considered of probative value in this investigation, although the Commission's conclusion concerning the identity of the assassin was based on evidence independent of the finding that Oswald attempted to kill General Walker.

( Report, pg. 187 )

 

Site Under Construction

"Had Oswald lived to face a trial, with competent defense it would have been risky, at best, for the authorities to try to make the claim that the physical evidence conclusively linked Oswald to the Walker shooting." --Gerald D. McKnight, Breach of Trust ( 2005 ) pg. 58.

 

In the left column, you will see links to pages with information on the problems with the evidence.  All links are listed in blue underline .

 

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